Canobolas Family Pet Hospital | Orange NSW

10 William St
Orange, NS 2800

(02)6362-6991

canobolasvet.com

Allergy is a common cause of skin disease causing itchiness in dogs and cats. Atopic skin disease is one common type of allergy and a reaction by an individual animal to environmental aeroallergens such as pollens from grasses, weeds, trees, mould spores and house dust mite. Dogs that are itchy are miserable.

 

Symptoms of allergy

 

The most common clinical sign of allergy is itching, most commonly involving the muzzle, around the eyes, ear flaps, armpits, groin and paws. Some dogs may have recurrent ear infections.

Diagnosis allergic skin disease

 

Intradermal allergy test:

 

The best way to identify a specific allergy to pollen, dust, mould or insects is to perform an intradermal allergy test.

This involves clipping a patch of hair from the side of the flank and pricking the skin with a tiny amount of purified allergen extract. A positive reaction is a raised swelling observed thirty minutes after intradermal injection.

 

Serological (blood) allergy testing:

 

We believe that by combining the results of the skin and serological testing that we can develop the most optimal allergy profile for your pet. This increases our chances of successful vaccine immunotherapy (desensitization).

Allergy treatments

There are several different ways allergy can be managed in order to keep your dog or cat comfortable.

Allergen specific immunotherapy with an allergy vaccine is the preferred method of treatment for canine and feline atopic dermatitis and involves using a vaccine that is made specifically for your pet on the basis of the skin and serum allergy test results.

How successful are allergy vaccines?

Allergy vaccines are successful in approximately 70% of dogs and cats with environmental allergic skin disease.

 


Referral for Intradermal Skin Testing:

Those patients being referred specifically for intradermal skin testing will need to have the following medications withdrawn prior to testing:

Oral corticosteroids (prednisone, etc) : 4 weeks

Short-acting injectable corticosteroids (dexamethasone, Vetalog) : 4-6 weeks

Long-acting injectable corticosteroids (DepoMedrol) : 8-12 weeks

Topical corticosteroids (including ear medications like Otomax) : 4 weeks

Antihistamines (Benadryl, Zyrtec, etc.) : 2 weeks Amitriptylline (Elavil) : 2 weeks

Oral progestins (Ovaban, etc.) : 4 weeks

Intact female dogs must be out of heat for at least 4 weeks before allergy testing can be performed.

 

Trees

Wattle

Weeds

English Plantain

 

Casuarina

 

Chenopodium

 

Eucalyptus

 

Ragweed, Western

 

Melaleuca

 

Rough Pigweed

 

Privet

 

Red Sorrel

 

Birch Mix

 

Cocklebur

 

Elm, Cedar

 

Dog Fennel

 

Elm, Chinese

 

Yellow Dock

 

Pine Mix

 

Tumbleweed

 

Olive

Moulds

Alternaria Tenuis

 

Peppercorn

 

Aspergillus Mix

 

Willow Arroyo

 

Cladosporium Herbarum

 

Willow Black

 

Penicillium Mix

 

Plane Tree

Insects

Fleas

 

White Oak

 

Insect Mix

 

Western Juniper

 

Cockroach Mix

Grasses

Cocksfoot Grass

 

Deer Fly

 

Couch

 

Mosquito

 

Kentucky Bluegrass

 

Moth

 

Fescue Grass

 

Ant

 

Johnson Grass

 

House Fly

 

Perennial Ryegrass

Mites

D.farinae

 

Paspalum

 

D.pteronyssinus

 

Oat

Misc.

Red Clover

 

Canary Grass

 

Tobacco

 

Red Top Grass

Flowers

Dandelion

 

Yorkshire Fog

 

 

 

Brome Grass

 

 

 

Sweet Vernal

 

 

 

English Couch

 

 

 

Timothy Grass

 

 

 

Cultivated Wheat